Marine Debris in the

Gulf of Mexico

Dog River abandoned vessel

The Gulf of Mexico has a productive, diverse, and beautiful coastline. Unfortunately, it is not immune to the impacts of marine debris. Marine debris in the Gulf of Mexico ranges from large concentrations of litter (i.e. cigarette butts and plastic bottles) that find their way through the storm drains to the beaches to large 190-foot derelict vessels that disturb marshes and seagrass habitats.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program aims to prevent and reduce marine debris in the Gulf of Mexico through education, research, removal, and response to large debris events. We can accomplish our goals through productive and meaningful partnerships with state, local, federal and non-governmental organizations.

FAQs

The NOAA Marine Debris Program offers several nationwide, competitive funding opportunities for marine debris projects. These include: marine debris removal grants; prevention through education and outreach grants; and research grants. Learn more about these opportunities.

Additional Resources

NOAA’s Marine Debris Program is happy to be working with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) to develop and implement a Regional Action Plan to address Marine Debris (pg. 38) in the Gulf of Mexico. Through public-private partnerships, GOMA has established Gulf Star, which provides competitive funding each year to support projects to accomplish the goals laid out in the action plan. If you are interested in learning more about the Marine Debris Cross Team Initiative or becoming involved with GOMA, you can find more information here.