Videos

Watch videos for information on marine debris and NOAA's work to address it.

  • NOAA Marine Debris Program Removal Webinar, April 2017
    NOAA Marine Debris Program Removal Webinar, April 2017
  • TRASH TALK: What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?
  • NOAA Divers Free Green Sea Turtle from Net in Hawaii
    NOAA Divers free turtle
  • First Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition
    First Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition
  • Second Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition
    Second Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition
  • Third Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition
    Third Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition
  • Third Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition
    Third Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition
  • Second Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition
    Second Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition
  • First Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition
    First Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition
  • DOC Talks: What We Can Do About Marine Debris
    DOC Talks: What We Can Do About Marine Debris
  • Tsunami Debris in California
    Man hauling large debris items from beach.
  • Gyre: Creating Art From a Plastic Ocean
    Woman sorts through marine debris.
  • OceansLIVE! Talking Trash: A Call to Action
    OceansLIVE! Talking Trash: A Call to Action
  • Our Debris Filling the Sea
    Debris on the sea floor.
  • What is Marine Debris?
    Debris floating in the water
  • Marine Debris
    Marine debris on the beach
  • TRASH TALK: Impacts of Marine Debris
    TRASH TALK: Impacts of Marine Debris
  • TRASH TALK Webinar for Educators
    Trash Talk Webinar Poster
  • TRASH TALK: What Can We Do About Marine Debris?
  • TRASH TALK: Marine Debris and Plastics
  • TRASH TALK: Where Does Marine Debris Come From?
  • TRASH TALK: What is Marine Debris?
  • TRASH TALK Special Feature
  • Avoid the Trap: What Anglers Should Know about Commercial Fishing Nets
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NOAA Marine Debris Program Removal Webinar, April 2017

On April 27, 2017, the NOAA Marine Debris Program highlighted three Community-Based Marine Debris Removal Grant projects focused on crab pots around the United States in a "removal webinar." This webinar provided an opportunity for NOAA’s existing partners to learn and exchange information pertaining to crab pot removals from different regions. The presentations covered project overviews, key measures of success, lessons learned, and general project highlights from the following removal projects:

  • Fisherman-led Dungeness crab gear recovery in Northern and Central California, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine
    Presenter: Kirsten Gilardi
  • Creating a self-sustaining strategy to remove derelict fishing gear in North Carolina, North Carolina Coastal Federation
    Presenter: Ladd Bayliss
  • Derelict crab trap removal and prevention in shallow coastal bays: transferring a sustainable marine debris program, Stockton University
    Presenters: Mark Sullivan and Steve Evert
TRASH TALK: What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?

It’s not a floating island of trash, like a garbage dump or a landfill. It’s also not the only patch. They exist all throughout the ocean, and the Pacific Garbage Patch just happens to be the most famous. Garbage patches are large areas of marine debris concentration that are formed by rotating ocean currents called gyres - kind of like big whirlpools that suck things in. A garbage patch is made up of tiny plastic pieces called “microplastics” that are less than 5 millimeters long. It’s more like pepper flakes swirling in a soup than something you can skim off the surface.

NOAA Divers Free Green Sea Turtle from Net in Hawaii

In October 2014, a team of 17 NOAA divers sailing aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette returned from a mission to remove marine debris from Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in Hawaii, a World Heritage Site and one of the largest marine conservation areas in the world. Divers encountered and rescued three sea turtles tangled in different nets.

First Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition

This video is the first place winner for the 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio Marine Debris Challenge. This competition invited students from Ohio's Lake Erie coastal communities to create public service announcements to bring awareness to the issue of marine debris.

Video Transcript:
Imagine you are swimming at Cedar Point Beach. Imagine the water is smooth against your skin and the sun is warm on your face.
Now imagine this is what you have to swim in (shows water full of debris). This is an example of the unfortunate reality of marine debris and pollution.
Over one million sea birds and mammals are killed each year at the expense of laziness of human beings.
An estimated 14 billion pounds of garbage and debris have been dumped into the Earth's oceans and waterways.
Our earth is irreplaceable, and it is not only the possibility, but the responsibility, for every individual to be capable of maintaining our world.
The residents of Ohio are gifted with an extraordinary state with a magnitude of natural beauties.
Dispose of your garbage properly and recycle if possible. No action can be considered too small in protecting our marine environment. The world's value is immeasurable.
Only you can prevent marine debris and pollution. Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.

Second Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition

This video is the second place winner for the 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio Marine Debris Challenge. This competition invited students from Ohio's Lake Erie coastal communities to create public service announcements to bring awareness to the issue of marine debris.

Video Transcript:
Marine debris causes wildlife entanglement and ingestion, economic costs, and habitat damage.
Many animals, such as sea turtles, seabirds, and marine mammals have been known to ingest marine debris. Marine debris ingestion may lead to loss of nutrition, internal injury, intestinal blockage, starvation, and even death.
It can scour, break, smother, and otherwise damage important marine habitats. Many habitats serve as the basis of marine ecosystems and are critical to the survival of many other species.
Marine debris is defined as any persistent solid material that is disposed of or abandoned into the marine environment or the Great Lakes.
There is no part of the world that is unaffected by marine debris, however it is preventable.
Get involved in local cleanups and encourage your community to help stop marine debris. You can also help by bringing reusable items instead of disposable ones to the beach. Keep the sidewalks, streets, and gutters free of trash because they empty into our Great Lakes.

Third Place Winner: 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio PSA Competition

This video is the third place winner for the 2017 "Communicating for a Clean Future" Ohio Marine Debris Challenge. This competition invited students from Ohio's Lake Erie coastal communities to create public service announcements to bring awareness to the issue of marine debris.

Video Transcript:
Every day, 2 million tons of sewage and industrial and agricultural waste are discharged into the world's water. That is the equivalent of the weight of the entire human population, which includes 6.8 billion people!
In some regions of the world, more than 50% of native freshwater fish species are at risk of extinction, and nearly one third of the world's amphibians are at risk of extinction as well.
Everyone loves the beach, so why would you litter on it? It's important to stay eco-friendly while at the beach so that we can enjoy our beaches for years and years to come!
During your next trip to the beach, think about the things you bring with you. If you see trash lying on the beach, make sure to clean it up! Even trash lying in the parking lot just outside of the beaches can end up in the ocean or lake. Many storm drains lead to a larger body of water, so any trash that ends up near a storm drain could get pushed into the ocean or a lake.
You can prevent marine debris on and off the beach.

Third Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition

This video was the third place winner for the 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris Public Service Announcement Competition in Ohio's 9th Congressional District.

Second Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition

This video was the second place winner for the 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris Public Service Announcement Competition in Ohio's 9th Congressional District.

First Place: 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris PSA Competition

This video was the first place winner for the 2016 “Communicating for a Clean Future” Marine Debris Public Service Announcement Competition in Ohio's 9th Congressional District.

DOC Talks: What We Can Do About Marine Debris

Join Krista Stegemann, the NOAA Marine Debris Program's Communications and Education Specialist, as she talks about marine debris at the first "DOC Talks" for the Department of Commerce. This 10-minute video gives an overview of what marine debris is, where it comes from, and what we're doing about it.

Tsunami Debris in California
Gyre: Creating Art From a Plastic Ocean
OceansLIVE! Talking Trash: A Call to Action

Join Amy Uhrin, NOAA Marine Debris Program's Chief Scientist, as she talks about marine debris with Katie Register, Executive Director of Clean Virginia Waterways, during Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2016's OceansLIVE! segment put on by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. This segment, titled "Talking Trash: A Call to Action," was originally live-streamed and talks about marine debris and what you can do to help.

Our Debris Filling the Sea

What do a tropical island in the Pacific Ocean and the Antarctic have in common? Unfortunately, it's marine debris. Even the most remote locations on Earth are fouled by man-made garbage and cast-outs. And a majority of the debris that's found comes from land-based sources.

Ocean Today is an interactive exhibit that plays short videos on ocean related themes.
Visitors can select from 150+ videos on topics ranging from deep-­‐sea exploration, marine species, and restoration projects to hurricanes, oceans and human health, and
climate science and research. These videos are a free resource and are available on our
website at oceantoday.noaa.gov.

What is Marine Debris?

Did you know that 52 metric tons of marine debris accumulate on uninhabited islands around the world? Marine debris is trash in the ocean that animals may confuse with food or plants. Seals get tangled in old nets and can die, turtles eat plastic bags hoping for a tasty jellyfish and can drown. Watch this video to see how NOAA is leading the way to minimize marine debris and find out what you can do to help marine animals and our oceans!

Marine Debris

Marine debris is the trash that eventually enters the ocean. It includes trash on the beach and trash that you can't see that is floating in the ocean. It is a big problem. The NOAA Marine Debris Program is working to tackle this problem that can harm marine mammals and sea turtles. What will you do to help?

"Marine Debris" is just one of many exciting videos on The Ocean Today Kiosk. For full effect, visit the Ocean Today Kiosk at the Smithsonian Institution's Sant Ocean Hall or at an aquarium near you.

TRASH TALK: Impacts of Marine Debris

Would you want to swim at a beach littered with trash? Of course not. And the animals who live in the ocean don't either - the difference is they don't have a choice.
Marine species often become tangled in debris, from fishing nets to six-pack rings and many mistake plastic debris for food, and eat it. This fills their stomachs with junk they can't digest.Debris can also damage important habitats, like coral reefs, by breaking or smothering them. Corals serve as the base of the marine ecosystem, and impacts here can be felt all the way to you and me. Let's prevent those impacts on wildlife. We need the ocean - and everything in it. And the ocean needs us to keep it free of debris.

TRASH TALK Webinar for Educators

This webinar provides fun activities that you can organize to engage people in museums, zoos, aquariums, learning centers and schools.
Featuring NOAA Marine Debris Program Educational Specialist Leah Henry, this fun and informative ten minute webinar provides a quick demonstration of hands on activities you can easily offer after you show any TRASH TALK videos.

TRASH TALK: What Can We Do About Marine Debris?

There are marine debris solutions, and together, we can prevent litter from ending up in the ocean. So what can we do? Well, the ultimate solution is prevention, and we need to keep that as our highest priority. We can reduce, reuse, and recycle to keep debris out of the ocean in the first place. You can bring your own shopping bag, drink out of a reusable bottle, and participate in things like a shoreline cleanup. Join a group cleaning the beach, or grab some friends and clean up your street! It's easy.

TRASH TALK: Marine Debris and Plastics

The 5 most common items found during the International Coastal Cleanup are plastic cigarette butts, food wrappers, plastic beverage bottles, plastic bottle caps, and plastic straws & drink stirrers. Notice anything in common with those things? It's a lot of single-use, disposable plastic.

TRASH TALK: Where Does Marine Debris Come From?

Marine debris comes from many different sources and enters the ocean in many ways. Intentional littering and dumping are a big cause of marine debris. Sometimes the trash goes directly into the ocean, like when beachgoers don’t pick up after themselves. Or sometimes, marine debris is indirectly generated in a city hundreds of miles from the ocean.

TRASH TALK: What is Marine Debris?

Marine debris is one of the biggest pollution problems facing the world's oceans and waterways today.
Marine debris is any man-made, solid material that enters waterways directly through littering or indirectly via rivers, streams and storm drains. Marine debris can be simple items such as a discarded soda can, cigarette butt, or plastic bag that ends up in the ocean potentially harming marine life. What this video to find out more and share it with others.

TRASH TALK Special Feature

Don’t you think it’s time we all have an honest trash talk? Ocean Today, in partnership with the NOAA Marine Debris Program, presents TRASH TALK, a 15-minute special feature on marine debris for World Ocean Day.

This feature video includes the TRASH TALK video shorts What is Marine Debris?, Where Does Marine Debris Come From?, Impacts of Marine Debris, Marine Debris and Plastics, What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch?, and What Can We Do About Marine Debris?

Avoid the Trap: What Anglers Should Know about Commercial Fishing Nets