Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve Marine Debris Cleanup and Reduction Program
Debris collects behind large trash booms that prevent it from reaching the ocean. (Photo Credit: Sand Diego Surfrider)
Debris collects behind large trash booms that prevent it from reaching the ocean. (Photo Credit: Sand Diego Surfrider)
Booms over a dry area.
Large trash booms will block debris from flowing into the ocean when the water flows. (Photo Credit: CA State Parks)
Debris accumulating behind booms in the water.
As the water flows, debris accumulates behind large trash booms that block the debris from flowing into the ocean. (Photo Credit: CA State Parks)
Debris stuck behind a large boom after the water has stopped flowing.
Large trash booms will block debris from flowing into the ocean when the water flows. (Photo Credit: CA State Parks)

The Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), with support from a NOAA Marine Debris Program Removal Grant, is working to remove debris from the Tijuana River NERR and prevent further debris from washing down the Tijuana River Watershed from Mexico.

Project Dates: July 2014 - July 2016

Who is involved?
With support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program's (MDP) Community-based Removal grant, the Southwest Wetlands Interpretive Association, Tijuana River NERR, California State Parks, WiLDCOAST, and Surfrider are working together to remove and prevent debris in the Tijuana River Valley.

What is the project and why is it important?
The large amounts of trash and larger debris that wash downstream from Mexico threaten and degrade the Tijuana River Valley’s valuable ecological, cultural, recreational, and economic resources. With support from the MDP Community-based removal grants program, the Southwest Wetlands Interpretive Association, Tijuana River NERR, California State Parks, WiLDCOAST, and Surfrider are working together to remove debris from this area as well as prevent future accumulation.

Tijuana River NERR staff will oversee the removal and disposal of debris that accumulates behind large trash booms that block the debris from flowing into the ocean. Upgrades will be made to the booms to improve their strength and stability during flood events. Debris settled in the Goat Canyon sediment basin farther upstream of the boom are excavated, sorted, and disposed of. The project also includes an outreach component to reduce and prevent future debris inundations within the Tijuana River Watershed. Outreach efforts in Tijuana include raising awareness within middle school classrooms and developing partnerships with city officials and the waste management industry.

More than 400 tons of debris are expected to be removed from the Tijuana River NERR by 2016. Addressing marine debris across international borders, outreach initiatives will stem the flow of debris from Mexico into the Tijuana River Watershed.

Click the image for a larger display.

Booms over a dry area.
Large trash booms will block debris from flowing into the ocean when the water flows. (Photo Credit: CA State Parks)
Debris accumulating behind booms in the water.
As the water flows, debris accumulates behind large trash booms that block the debris from flowing into the ocean. (Photo Credit: CA State Parks)
Debris stuck behind a large boom after the water has stopped flowing.
Large trash booms will block debris from flowing into the ocean when the water flows. (Photo Credit: CA State Parks)