Marine Debris Blog

Give Thanks and Give Back to Our Ocean

Tue, 2017-11-21 08:00
Give Thanks and Give Back to Our Ocean Two plastic forks on sand. krista.e.stegemann Tue, 11/21/2017 - 11:00

It’s almost Thanksgiving and here the NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP), we’re thinking about what we’re most thankful for this year.

At the MDP, we’re thankful for the wonderful partners that we work with to help spread the message, clean up, and learn more about the issue of marine debris. We’re also thankful for all the people out there that are thinking about marine debris and how they can help. Each person that thinks “you know, maybe I’ll use a reusable bag at the grocery store today”—we’re thankful for you and your efforts to reduce extra waste that could find its way to the ocean!

Marine Debris Work with Alaskan Native Communities

Wed, 2017-11-15 08:00
Marine Debris Work with Alaskan Native Communities Two people on a boat with a derelict crab pot. krista.e.stegemann Wed, 11/15/2017 - 11:00

In celebration of National Native American Heritage Month, the NOAA Office of Response and Restoration’s Marine Debris Program and Assessment and Restoration Division are highlighting collaboration with native communities, nations, and peoples.

Native communities and their in-depth knowledge of local history and conditions are essential for addressing marine debris in Alaska. A large proportion of Alaska’s coast is remote, so addressing debris can be difficult. Native peoples often have specific knowledge and experience that are important for marine debris efforts in these areas and the NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP) is proud and grateful to have worked with Alaskan Native organizations on several marine debris projects.

Marine Debris Work with West Coast Native Communities

Mon, 2017-11-13 08:00
Marine Debris Work with West Coast Native Communities  NOAA) krista.e.stegemann Mon, 11/13/2017 - 11:00

In celebration of National Native American Heritage Month, the NOAA Office of Response and Restoration’s Marine Debris Program and Assessment and Restoration Division are highlighting collaboration with native communities, nations, and peoples.

Many native communities in the Western United States are tied to the ocean, depending on its resources for economic well-being and cultural identity. The NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP) is proud to have worked with native communities on the West Coast to protect these resources by preventing and removing marine debris.

Mississippi Coastal Cleanup

Thu, 2017-11-09 08:00
Mississippi Coastal Cleanup Students collecting data during the Mississippi Coastal Cleanup. krista.e.stegemann Thu, 11/09/2017 - 11:00

By: Amanda Sartain, Extension Program Assistant at Mississippi State University

Since 1988, thousands of Mississippi Coastal Cleanup volunteers have contributed hours of hard work and dedication to the removal of marine debris, which includes any solid, man-made material that ends up in the marine environment either intentionally or unintentionally. Millions of pounds of marine debris have been removed from Mississippi beaches, waterways, and barrier islands over the years. Unsurprisingly, commonly-collected trash items have included cigarette butts, food wrappers, plastic bottles, and straws. During last year’s cleanup event, over 14 tons of trash were collected. Cigarette butts, food wrappers, and plastic beverage bottles were once again among the most common items found. 

The 29th annual Mississippi Coastal Cleanup will take place Saturday, November 18th, from 8 to 11am. Come get involved!

Innovative Marine Debris Removal Projects

Tue, 2017-11-07 08:00
Innovative Marine Debris Removal Projects A barge carrying many bags of debris. krista.e.stegemann Tue, 11/07/2017 - 11:00

Marine debris is a big global problem that must be addressed on multiple fronts: outreach to stop littering and encourage better use of products, research to investigate and inform, and of course, removal of marine debris to alleviate its harmful impacts. When it comes to removal, the options range in complexity. The marine debris community is resourceful and creative, and over time has developed a number of innovative removal methods. Since what works for one, could work for the many who may have similar challenges and needs, the NOAA Marine Debris Program has assembled several method overview summaries to facilitate better sharing of innovative techniques for marine debris removal.

Trash or Treat

Tue, 2017-10-31 08:00
Trash or Treat Graphic of Halloween candy saying to hold on to your wrappers. krista.e.stegemann Tue, 10/31/2017 - 11:00

BOO! It’s Halloween—the scariest day of the year—and nothing is more frightening on All Hallows’ Eve than… marine debris!

Halloween is both scary and fun, but unfortunately often results in an increase in trash that can become marine debris. But, thankfully there are ways to *actually* be a superhero (not just dress like one!) and take steps to prevent this from happening!

NOAA Marine Debris Program Releases 2017 Accomplishments Report

Tue, 2017-10-24 08:00
NOAA Marine Debris Program Releases 2017 Accomplishments Report Cover of the 2017 Accomplishments Report. krista.e.stegemann Tue, 10/24/2017 - 11:00

Once a year, we like to take a moment to reflect on our efforts to investigate and prevent the adverse impacts of marine debris and to think about how far we’ve come. This past year has certainly been a busy one as we’ve moved forward under the guidance of our strategic plan and five program pillars—prevention, removal, research, emergency response, and regional coordination. With the help of many partners, we have been able to accomplish a great deal. The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to present our 2017 Accomplishments Report, which highlights some of our major accomplishments over the past year.

Now Open: The Annual NOAA Marine Debris Program Art Contest!

Mon, 2017-10-16 08:00
Now Open: The Annual NOAA Marine Debris Program Art Contest! Student artwork of a seal with debris around it. krista.e.stegemann Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:00

Are you a student or teacher that’s passionate about marine debris? Then get your art supplies ready, because this year’s NOAA Marine Debris Program Art Contest is officially open! Students in grades K-8 from all U.S states and territories can submit their artwork now through November 30th. Enter today and you could see your artwork featured in our 2019 Marine Debris Calendar! So get crafty, get creative, and help us raise awareness about marine debris! 

Debris-Free Football: Tailgating Without the Trash

Fri, 2017-10-13 08:00
Debris-Free Football: Tailgating Without the Trash A football amid dirty plastic bottles. krista.e.stegemann Fri, 10/13/2017 - 11:00

The start of cooler weather means fall is here and for many, that also means the start of a very important season— football season! Whether you follow your local high school, college, or professional team, you likely enjoy all the festivities that come with it. This may include wearing your favorite jersey to every game, getting together with friends for a viewing party at home, or partaking in the tradition of tailgating. Tailgating is a favorite pastime of football fans, but can unfortunately result in lots of debris left behind. Thankfully, there are many ways in which you can still enjoy this football season pastime without contributing to marine debris.

How the NOAA Marine Debris Program Responds to Hurricane Debris

Thu, 2017-10-05 08:00
How the NOAA Marine Debris Program Responds to Hurricane Debris A destroyed building on the water. krista.e.stegemann Thu, 10/05/2017 - 11:00

When you think of marine debris, you likely think of items carelessly discarded and winding up in our waters. Although that is definitely one source, sometimes debris is created by events outside of our control. Severe storms and weather events often result in a large amount of marine debris. Although there are steps we can take to reduce the amount of storm debris, such as securing our belongings before the storm hits, debris is often an unfortunate and unavoidable side effect of severe weather.

Find out how the NOAA Marine Debris Program and others respond to hurricane debris.

The Bow Seat Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition is Now Open!

Wed, 2017-10-04 08:00
The Bow Seat Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition is Now Open! Plastic bottles on a store shelf, with the ocean full of fish inside them. One being held is full of cloudy and polluted water. krista.e.stegemann Wed, 10/04/2017 - 11:00

Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Programs is launching their second Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition! Funded by a NOAA Marine Debris Program Prevention grant, this competition serves as a fun and exciting way for students to actively take part in preventing marine debris by carrying out real-world projects.

Find out how to participate and where you should start!

Beach Cleanup… Then What? Debris Disposal in Alaska

Thu, 2017-09-28 09:00
Beach Cleanup… Then What? Debris Disposal in Alaska People picking up debris among logs and brush. krista.e.stegemann Thu, 09/28/2017 - 12:00

By: Peter Murphy, Alaska Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program

Alaska is characterized by its rugged beauty, remote wilderness, and sheer size. These facts also play a significant role in the issue of marine debris in the state. With so much coastline, Alaska receives a huge amount of debris every year from both local sources and places across the Pacific Rim. “Catcher beaches,” where the shape and character of the coastline interacts with weather and ocean patterns to deposit huge amounts of debris, are often remote and can accumulate as much as 10-20 tons of debris per mile. Cleaning up debris in these areas can be difficult, but Alaskans are up to the task, using landing craft, helicopters, and good old-fashioned hard work and Alaskan ingenuity to remove debris in rugged and challenging conditions. 

The real trick actually begins once the debris is off the beach.

Notice: Marine Debris Prevention Grant Letter of Intent Due Date Change

Tue, 2017-09-26 12:00
Notice: Marine Debris Prevention Grant Letter of Intent Due Date Change  Monterey Bay Aquarium) krista.e.stegemann Tue, 09/26/2017 - 15:00

Due to recent severe weather in several parts of the country, the due date for the Letters of Intent (LOI) for the NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Marine Debris Prevention grant opportunity has changed. Letters of Intent will now be due on October 5, 2017. As a reminder, applicants for the Marine Debris Prevention grant opportunity must first submit an LOI, after which only those invited to submit a full proposal will be considered for funding. Applicants will be notified by November 1, 2017 if they have been invited to submit a full proposal. For more details, visit Grants.gov.

Addressing Marine Debris in Alaska

Tue, 2017-09-26 08:00
Addressing Marine Debris in Alaska Students around a table sorting waste. krista.e.stegemann Tue, 09/26/2017 - 11:00

Meet Peter Murphy, the Alaska Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program. Reach out to Peter at peter.murphy@noaa.gov!

Alaska is a beautiful and unique place. Unfortunately, like much of the country, this area is plagued by marine debris. Addressing this issue can be challenging considering Alaska has an extensive and rugged coastline, much of which is remote and difficult to access. Thankfully, there are many people out there who are working hard to address the marine debris problem in this region. Check out some of the projects funded by the NOAA Marine Debris Program that are working to prevent and remove debris in Alaska.

Congratulations to the 2017 Bow Seat Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition Winners!

Mon, 2017-09-25 08:00
Congratulations to the 2017 Bow Seat Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition Winners! Students standing under a large, hanging whale sculpture. krista.e.stegemann Mon, 09/25/2017 - 11:00

Last year, Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Programs launched their first Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition, funded by a NOAA Marine Debris Program Prevention grant. The competition empowered middle and high school students in the United States to use their creative talents to raise awareness and carry out real-world projects that address marine debris issues in their community. Bow Seat is now excited to announce the winners of the 2017 competition, who used community outreach events and marine debris cleanups alongside visual arts, poetry, music, and mobile apps to engage their schools and communities in creative and innovative ways. Find out about the next Marine Debris Creative Advocacy Competition too!

2017 International Coastal Cleanup: A Success!

Mon, 2017-09-18 09:15
2017 International Coastal Cleanup: A Success!  CoastSavers) krista.e.stegemann Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:15

Thank you to all the volunteers that showed up and cleaned up at this year’s International Coastal Cleanup (ICC) on Saturday! This year’s event was another success due to the many volunteers that helped collect (literally) tons of trash! This yearly event not only removes damaging marine debris from communities around the globe, but also raises awareness of the important issue of marine debris. The data collected at each event is also used to discover what trash items are most problematic and most likely to become marine debris. Check out some of the photos from this year’s ICC events around the country.

Don’t Miss the International Coastal Cleanup This Saturday!

Thu, 2017-09-14 08:00
Don’t Miss the International Coastal Cleanup This Saturday! Someone placing a plastic bottle into a bag. krista.e.stegemann Thu, 09/14/2017 - 11:00

It’s almost here! The annual International Coastal Cleanup is this Saturday, September 16th.

If you’re looking for something to do this weekend and you’d like to do your part to help address the marine debris problem, join thousands of volunteers from around the world to clean up your local area. Each year, the International Coastal Cleanup brings people together from around the globe to clean up marine debris in their local communities. Join us this year—find a location near you and sign up to clean up!

Marine Debris in National Marine Sanctuaries

Mon, 2017-09-11 08:00
Marine Debris in National Marine Sanctuaries Debris on a beach in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. krista.e.stegemann Mon, 09/11/2017 - 11:00

Even though marine debris is an entirely human-caused problem, debris can often be found in large quantities in remote areas that are far from human populations. This can include areas such as Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and even the bottom of the ocean floor! Our National Marine Sanctuary System protects the United States’ most iconic natural and cultural marine resources such as these, and unfortunately they too are under threat.

Keep an eye on the NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Facebook and Twitter accounts this week, as well as the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries’ Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr —there will be lots of posts throughout the week to help you learn more about marine debris, its impacts, and solutions in the National Marine Sanctuary System.

The International Coastal Cleanup is Coming

Tue, 2017-09-05 08:00
The International Coastal Cleanup is Coming Kids cleaning up debris at the 2016 International Coastal Cleanup. krista.e.stegemann Tue, 09/05/2017 - 11:00

It’s almost that time of year—time for the International Coastal Cleanup (ICC)! This annual event, put on by the Ocean Conservancy and supported by the NOAA Marine Debris Program, works to bring people together from across the globe to clean up marine debris in their local communities. Last year’s cleanup resulted in more than 18 million pounds of trash collected by over 504,000 volunteers covering almost 15,000 miles! Find a cleanup near you and sign up to clean up today! The 2017 International Coastal Cleanup is Saturday, September 16th—we’ll see you there!

New Updates on the Sixth International Marine Debris Conference!

Thu, 2017-08-31 07:00
New Updates on the Sixth International Marine Debris Conference! Image of an albatross looking at debris on a beach with the 6IMDC identity marker on the photo. krista.e.stegemann Thu, 08/31/2017 - 10:00

With over 600 participants expected to attend, the Sixth International Marine Debris Conference (6IMDC) provides a unique opportunity to promote science, collaboration, innovation, and action in the marine debris community. Participants will be surrounded by fellow marine debris advocates, educators, researchers, and pioneers during the five-day event taking place in San Diego, California, USA on March 12 -16, 2018. Check out the new and exciting 6IMDC opportunities!

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